in

LMI-TCS Team Conducts Climate Risk Assessment of F-35 Support Facilities

F-35
F-35

LMI and The Climate Service predict that the U.S. military's current F-35 support infrastructure could experience significant disruption from extreme temperature, storm damage and coastal flooding events over the next three decades.

Both companies used the Climanomics risk analytics platform during a joint analysis of possible physical climate risks to five bases that maintain the fifth-generation fighter aircraft, LMI said Monday.

The assessment covered Eglin AF Base, Joint Base Langley““Eustis, Hill AFB, Luke AFB and Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni.

“While risks like flooding and storm damage are unsurprising, we accounted for the unique vulnerabilities of each facility's assets and their criticality to mission success," said Audra Upchurch, director of LMI's infrastructure, energy and environment practice.

"We're excited to deliver actionable insights to inform  master planning decisions and infrastructure improvements.“

The Climanomics tool is designed to help analysts examine multiscenario physical and transition challenges for an asset or a portfolio within an 80-year timeframe.

Kelli Canada, sustainability senior consultant at LMI, noted the technology combines data on climate-related hazards and econometric models to facilitate mission-centric risk analysis.

The Government Accountability Office reported that hurricanes Florence and Michael caused more than $3B in damage to U.S. Marine Corps installations in North Carolina and Tyndall AFB in Florida.

ExecutiveBiz Logo

Sign Up Now! ExecutiveBiz provides you with Daily Updates and News Briefings about Technology

mm

Written by Matthew Nelson

Peter Villano Azure Director Microsoft
Microsoft’s Peter Villano: SBA, DoD Should Reduce Barriers to Small Biz Participation in Gov’t Tech Programs
Chuck Prow CEO Vectrus
Vectrus to Extend Guantanamo Bay Naval Base Operations Support; Chuck Prow Quoted